How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

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How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

Superfoods are nutrient-rich foods considered to be especially beneficial for health, well-being and the prevention of disease. Superfood ingredients like hemp, chia and coconut are popular in energy bars marketed to health-conscious consumers, but they’re often paired with added sugars such as agave, coconut sugar or honey. To avoid the excess sweetness without sacrificing the great health benefits of these foods, try making these Hemp Protein Bars recommended by Andrea Kapner, a certified Health Educator who teaches nutrition and cooking classes to children and adults in New York City. Kapner says, “These bars are incredibly easy to make once you have all the ingredients on hand. Chia seeds are small but pack in fiber, protein and omega-3s.” INGREDIENTS: 1 cup pumpkin seeds, 1 cup dried shredded coconut, 1/2 cup hemp hearts (shelled hemp seeds), 1/2 cup hemp protein powder (you can use hemp hearts instead), 4 tablespoons chia seeds, 20 fresh Medjool dates (pitted), 6 tablespoons coconut oil, 4 tablespoons cacao powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or 1/2 teaspoon ground vanilla, 6 tablespoons rolled oats, and 2 tablespoons poppy seeds. Click the link below to see full directions and complete calorie and nutrition information.

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

Prep15 m Cook20 m Ready In1 h 35 m Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly oil a 9×13-inch baking dish. Mix the eggs, banana, oats, sunflower seeds, cinnamon, milk powder, dates, raisins, walnuts, apricots, wheat germ, maple syrup, and whole-wheat pastry flour together in a large bowl until thoroughly combined; spread the mixture evenly into the prepared baking dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes; set aside to cool. Cut into 9 bars and wrap with plastic to store. You might also like Delicious Raspberry Oatmeal Cookie Bars Easy jammy cookie bars are the best! Chocolate Energy Bars Fresh, homemade and full of energy! Brownie Mallow Bars The brownie that’s marshmallowy good! Get the magazine Get a full year for just $7.99! Cook 5-star weekday dinners every time.

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

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11. Rise and Shine Bars Get up and at ‘em with these gluten-free crunch bars. Puffed brown rice cereal provides a lower calorie base than most store-bought bars, while flax seeds, pine nuts, pecans and dried cranberries add healthy fats and antioxidants. To make these bars even healthier, ditch the brown sugar in favor of honey. Photo and Recipe: Meg / Beard & Bonnet

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

Most of us lead busy lives and we end up eating packaged “convenience” foods more than we’d like. Energy bars may seem like a smart source of fuel when you're in a rush, but many of the store-bought options contain amounts of sugar that can make an otherwise balanced diet unbalanced. Americans are already overdoing it when it comes to sugar: Research shows that the average American consumes 22 teaspoons (355 calories) of added sugar a day, with a large majority coming from processed and prepared foods. But if you make your own energy bars, you can get all of the macronutrients and a variety of vitamins and minerals without all of the added sugar and additives. Read on to learn how to make nutritious, delicious DIY energy bars.

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

iStock Most of us lead busy lives and we end up eating packaged “convenience” foods more than we’d like. Energy bars may seem like a smart source of fuel when you're in a rush, but many of the store-bought options contain amounts of sugar that can make an otherwise balanced diet unbalanced. Americans are already overdoing it when it comes to sugar: Research shows that the average American consumes 22 teaspoons (355 calories) of added sugar a day, with a large majority coming from processed and prepared foods. But if you make your own energy bars, you can get all of the macronutrients and a variety of vitamins and minerals without all of the added sugar and additives. Read on to learn how to make nutritious, delicious DIY energy bars.

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

8. Apple Cinnamon Bars Full of fall flavor, these bars mix pecans, oats, dates, cinnamon, granny smith apples and just a touch of salt. Bake the pecans before pulsing in the food processor for a more robust, roasted flavor. if you’d like these bars a little extra spicy, don’t be afraid to go to town on the cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger. Photo and Recipe: Alexandra / Confessions of a Bright-Eyed Baker

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

13. Five Seed Bars These bars are super seedy — times five! Made with chia, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin and poppy seeds, there’s plenty of flavor — and fiber — rolled into these no-bake bars. Add in coconut, dates and cocoa powder, and we’ll be looking forward to these all week long. Photo and Recipe: Renee / Nourish Your Roots

How To Make Nutrition Bars At Home

21. No-Bake Chocolate Cherry Almond Energy Bars Photo: Dramatic Pancake Chocolate + cherry + almond is one of our favorite combos, and these bars don’t disappoint. The date base makes the bars soft, while nuts add a satisfying crunch. If you have extra time, try soaking the dates in water for an hour before you start, so that they’ll blend up better in the food processor. 

26. Fuel-to-Go Homemade Protein Bars Photo: Art and the Kitchen With four varieties of seeds, two different berries, and some crisped rice, these bars pack a lot of flavor into a small package. They come together the same way as traditional Rice Krispie treats—but with peanut butter rather than marshmallows. A much better choice for protein bars (as much as we love marshmallows—in cocoa or desserts, that is).

Maggie Moon, M.S., RD, author of “The Elimination Diet Workbook,” created her own pistachio-apricot energy bar to meet her preference for “natural sweetness from sweet-tart fruit, buttery richness from a heart-healthy nut like pistachios and a mellow base note from whole grains.” She uses pomegranate molasses for a bit of sweet stickiness, and the juice of an orange or some olive oil to keep the mixture from being too dry. Together, these ingredients make for a well-rounded nutrition bar providing carbohydrates, protein, fat, fiber, vitamins and minerals. INGREDIENTS: 1 cup rolled oats, 1 cup pistachios, ½ cup dried apricots (roughly chopped), 1/2 cup dried tart cherries (or dried cranberries), 2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1 medium navel orange, zest and then juice, olive oil (optional), 1 pinch of salt. Click the link below to see full directions and complete calorie and nutrition information.

This Paleo-friendly energy bar doesn't contain any added sugar and is grain- and dairy-free. Many of the ingredients used in non-Paleo energy bars such as dried fruit and nuts are included in these too, but the Paleo versions have unique twists that make them fun to try and to taste. For instance the Primal Palate, a site dedicated to recipes and menus that fit the Paleo lifestyle, makes a snack bar with eggs as a protein source and coconut oil for added fat. INGREDIENTS: 1 cup dried apricots, 1 cup almonds, 1 cup cashews, 2 eggs, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt, 1/2 vanilla bean pod, scraped, and 1/2 teaspoon coconut oil. Click the link below to see full directions and complete calorie and nutrition information.

For a twist, Mother Nature Network’s ChocoBean Power Bars uses cooked black beans to “add protein and fiber without overpowering the banana and chocolate flavors.” The recipe is quick and easy to make, and there’s no cooking involved if you use canned beans. INGREDIENTS: 1 1/2 cups cooked black beans, drained and rinsed, 3/4 cup dried banana slices, 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, 1/3 cup (packed) raisins or dried cranberries, 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, 1/2 cup brown rice syrup, 1/4 cup oatmeal blended until very fine, 1/4 cup ground flaxseed, 1/2 cup semisweet mini chocolate chips (optional), 2 tablespoons almond meal, fine. Click the link below to see full directions and complete calorie and nutrition information.

Making your own energy bars at home from nutritious whole ingredients is a great way to get “real” food throughout the day, without all the added sugar. Remember to include a variety of macro- and micronutrients: carbs from cereal grains and dried fruit, fat and protein from nuts, seeds, protein powders and nut butters. Many bars can be stored for one to two weeks in an airtight container.

7. Fig and Walnut Energy Bars  We can’t think of a better way to deliver nature’s candy — in this case, dried cranberries, Turkish figs and apricots. Make a big batch of these hearty bars and you’ll be set on healthy snacks for up to 10 days. Photo and Recipe: Perry Santanachote / Life by Daily Burn 

1. Homemade Granola Bars Photo: What's Gaby Cooking These bars are loaded with all kinds of good stuff, yet it all comes together in a delicious mix of flavors and textures. Almonds lend a bit of protein and crunch, dried cranberries and raisins bring the sweet and chewy, and chocolate chips make it a party. Toasting the oats may seem unnecessary, but it pumps up their flavor and makes them a little crispy.

2. Quinoa Chia Seed Granola Bars Photo: Wendy Polisi Seeds aren’t just for the birds, and these not-too-sweet bars prove it. Raw almonds along with chia and flax seeds, make them crunchy and provide some omega-3s. Nut butter and quinoa add staying power, so you’ll feel full until dinner.

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