Home Pullup Bar

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Home Pullup Bar

I wanted to try the Pro-Grade 12-grip position bar sold by Beachbody because it’s the “official” bar of P90X/Asylum, and because it touts itself as the sturdiest bar out there. After testing however, it was my least favorite of the bars, and not because because it failed a very basic test: it didn’t work on any of my doors (and I’m not the only one, apparently). It’s the only bar that has a safety feature that requires drilling into the drywall over the interior door, top molding mount position. Because I didn’t want to drill, and because I’d read enough reviews already advocating that users skip this unnecessary safety step, I skipped the step. I hung it on my 28” door to find that two metal cylinder ends bore into my molding. I tried it on a 30” door and had the same result. I never got to do a single pullup; This one is a firm pass.

Home Pullup Bar

“The doorjamb ones are all pretty terrible,” trainer Will Lanier says, laughing. He’s referring to the most ubiquitous fitness equipment around: pullup bars. “The door models restrict the way you can use them, and even if you have the best door in the world, you could still fall off the wall.” Instead, he recommends a “bitchin’ wall-mounted bar you screw into the studs of your wall so you never have to worry about showing up on YouTube with an #epicfail hashtag.” The bar he recommends most highly is Titan’s wall-mounted version pictured above ($75, titan.fitness). “It’s made of steel and comes away from the wall by almost three feet, so you can do not only pullups but also ab work. You can also get a set of gymnastics rings and do dips and ring pullups or strict to straight muscle-ups. The Titan has so many workout options, you’ll definitely use it for more than just another thing to throw your dirty clothes on.” The Anti-Aging Workout >>> Top Stories 13 pieces of tough gear every outdoorsman needsFashionAdam Bible Today HealthPhone use while driving can be tragicAdam Bible Gear reviewsMeet Vi, the AI personal trainerBrittany Smith Technology Technology

Home Pullup Bar

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“The doorjamb ones are all pretty terrible,” trainer Will Lanier says, laughing. He’s referring to the most ubiquitous fitness equipment around: pullup bars. “The door models restrict the way you can use them, and even if you have the best door in the world, you could still fall off the wall.” Instead, he recommends a “bitchin’ wall-mounted bar you screw into the studs of your wall so you never have to worry about showing up on YouTube with an #epicfail hashtag.” The bar he recommends most highly is Titan’s wall-mounted version pictured above ($75, titan.fitness). “It’s made of steel and comes away from the wall by almost three feet, so you can do not only pullups but also ab work. You can also get a set of gymnastics rings and do dips and ring pullups or strict to straight muscle-ups. The Titan has so many workout options, you’ll definitely use it for more than just another thing to throw your dirty clothes on.” The Anti-Aging Workout >>>

Home Pullup Bar

Footnotes: 1. First, there are wall or ceiling-mounted varieties. These are incredibly sturdy (and capable of handling the dynamic action of a kipping pull-up) because they must be mounted to the studs (wooden structural beams underneath drywall) or joists (overhead wooden beams above ceiling). The Stud Bar is a highly acclaimed example of this type of bar. We chose not to test these because we were aiming for simplicity of setup for the average user; thus, we didn’t want to involve a bunch of tools. Also, for folks who are renting, we didn’t want to recommend a product that landlords wouldn’t allow. If, on the other hand, you have a garage or basement and don’t mind doing a bit of drilling, I would highly recommend these sturdy units. The second type of unit is the telescoping pull-up bar. Historically, this was the first offering in the doorway category, and it is a very simple/no frills product. Here’s the well-reviewed Big Mike’s bar. We saw several problems with these types of bars. First, they need to be drilled into the doorframe for safe use. While some of them claim to use drill-free, suction-type connection, beware of safety issues. Here’s an example of the suction failing while in use. Secondly, in order to put them high enough on the door for the user’s feet to get off the ground, they must be installed near the top of the doorframe where it’s easy to bonk your head when doing a pull-up. Finally, they don’t offer any variation in grip position. The third type of unit is the free-standing pull-up bar. This type of unit can be really nice and also include dip bars and abdominal exercise options, but they are large pieces of stand-alone equipment that eat up space and typically cost more than $100. Plus, they also require a more involved setup process. The Stamina 1690 Power Tower is a really popular and affordable example of this type of pull-up unit and includes dip/ab options as well. The fourth type of pull-up bar is the home-built type of unit. These can either be mounted to ceilings or walls using gas pipe flanges, metal pipe, etc, or they can be built in a backyard. While these tend to be sturdy and affordable, they obviously require some handyman skills and a significant investment of time. Here’s a tutorial on building an at-home unit if you’re so inclined. The fifth type is the door frame type, which we covered extensively due to their ease of installation and use. Jump back.

Home Pullup Bar

In terms of grip variation, the Multi-Gym has one long foam-covered bar (38 inches) that allows the user to grip overhand (knuckles facing user, the “pull-up” position) or underhand (knuckles facing away from user, the “chin up” position) along the length of that bar in various configurations. I am able to get my hands in four different configurations (from hands touching each other to wide grip with hands at opposite ends of the bar) on the bar alone. Then, there is the neutral (or “hammer”) grip position of the bars that run at a perpendicular angle to the long bar. The neutral grip position is key because it allows the shoulders to be in an externally rotated position which generally puts less pressure on the on the shoulder joint. For more information on the neutral grip position, which lines up the wrists, elbows and shoulders in an optimal working position, see this article on improving pull-ups by strength legend Charles Poliquin. The wide grip position on the Multi-Gym is also worth mentioning. The Iron Gym Total Upper Body Workout Bar is the number-one seller on Amazon and is the Iron Gym equivalent of the Perfect Multi-Gym. But users of the Iron Gym complain that its wide grip position is set too flush to the molding to actually use. They claim that the hands/arms end up chafing against the molding while in the wide grip position. The Perfect Multi-Gym wide grip position is set far enough off the wall that there is no issue/friction while using it.

Home Pullup Bar

The best pull up bar is the one that fits your life and home gym situation. That said, getting a chin up bar / pull up bar isn’t going to immediately turn you into a sculpted god. Pull ups are one of the best exercises you can do for your upper body fitness, but you have to DO THEM. So get a pull up bar that you can install in a place where you’re going to see it and be compelled to use it.  A doorway pull up bar in the middle of your home can definitely help you achieve your fitness goals. The next step is yours.

Home Pullup Bar

“If you have a doorway pull-up bar and a floor to do push-ups on, you’ve got everything you need for a complete upper body workout.”—Al KavadloDoorway pull-up bars are sturdy, easy to assemble, easy to use, and inexpensive fitness tools that anyone who exercises should have in their home. I spoke with Al Kavadlo, bodyweight strength guru and author of the definitive book on pull-ups, Raising the Bar: The Definitive Guide to Pull-up Bar Calisthenics. He said, “A doorway pull-up bar is the simplest and most versatile piece of fitness equipment you can buy for your home. If you have a doorway pull-up bar and a floor to do push-ups on, you’ve got everything you need for a complete upper body workout.” The six units I tested all offer potential benefit for those looking to improve shoulder, back, arm, and abdominal strength. Some of them offer advanced options for experienced users, while others offer options for people who can’t do a single pull-up yet.

Home Pullup Bar

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