Home Espresso Bar

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Home Espresso Bar

Making espresso involves pushing hot water through a compact ‘puck’ of grounds at high pressure, usually at around 9 bar (9 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level). The reason you see bags of coffee labeled as espresso is either because its contents are pre-ground to a fine size that suits espresso brewing, or it is a blend that has been crafted to create a balance of flavors when brewed as espresso.

Home Espresso Bar

From the business Espresso Bar serving a limited menu of excellent food from morning to night, including breakfast dishes, pastries, salads, sandwiches, pastas, soups, and charcuterie & cheese plates. … Learn more about Home Espresso Bar – CLOSED , Opens a popup Specialties Espresso Bar serving a limited menu of excellent food from morning to night, including breakfast dishes, pastries, salads, sandwiches, pastas, soups, and charcuterie & cheese plates. Report

Home Espresso Bar

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Most high-end espresso machines are Italian-made and imported, not to mention expensive. A couple of years ago, Breville—that of the Williams Sonoma ubiquity—decided to be bold and tackle serious espresso making with the release of a double-boiler model. The company claims it consulted with espresso experts and baristas in order to make a truly high-quality machine. We had a chance to test out the Breville BES900XL and were impressed with its capabilities. The Breville allows for tons of control over brewing, such as shot temperature, pre-infusion time, and pre-infusion pressure adjustment. It also has some really great conveniences such as a wheeled base and font-filling reservoir that you wouldn’t normally find on an Italian machine. It produces great espresso, provided you are grinding with a suitable burr grinder and playing with the variables to suit the coffee.

Home Espresso Bar

9. Espresso Cup Gallery: This is South African architect Lari Levy’s coffee bar, or should we say, espresso cup gallery. If you have this many unique espresso cups to show off, installing shelving above your coffee bar is a must. (via Poppytalk)

Home Espresso Bar

First, you’ll have your espresso machine – obviously. You should not use tap water in your espresso machine, unless you know that the water is filtered and softened. I use bottled spring water to fill my home espresso machine. I buy it in the grocery store. It comes in gallon jugs for about $1 per jug. Very worthwhile!

Home Espresso Bar

Also, to calibrate the size of your espresso shots, you might want a pair of shot glasses – so as to be able to place one under each spout of the portafilter as the espresso extracts. For an automatic espresso machine, you’ll only need to calibrate (as set the shot) once. But for a semiautomatic, you might want to extract into the shot glasses in general.

Espresso is a mysterious drink. Not many people really know what it really is, how it’s made, or even what it should taste like. We've all been lured into a haze of misunderstanding and misinformation by the likes of Starbucks, Nespresso, Krups, and countless other brands looking to make espresso easy and cheap. Don't take the bait. Espresso, done right, is wonderful. Here's how the best in the business do it.

Espresso is not type of coffee bean, or a type of roast. Espresso is simply a method, a way to brew coffee. In fact, any coffee can be brewed as espresso—though some types taste better than others.

Lower cost machines feature a single boiler, and are sometimes driven by inadequate steam pressure rather than pump pressure. If you go this route, you will see wildly inconsistent results, and if you are making milk-based drinks, you'll have to wait in between brewing espresso and steaming milk so that the temperature can recover. Keep in mind, you can achieve good espresso with a quality single-boiler machine that is pump-driven, but it will require a great deal of attention and fiddling to get great results every time. A good one will cost around $600. Some people even mod their single boiler espresso machines by adding a PID controller themselves. A popular machine for this hack is the Rancilio Silvia (image to the left by Flickr user TonalLuminosity)

It makes excellent espresso without wearing out your espresso machine, and it’s very inexpensive. So near my espresso machine, I keep a plastic, store-bought, gallon jug of filtered spring water.

Next is the espresso grinder. Note that you can buy preground espresso, in which case you won’t need a grinder. But if you use preground espresso, you will need a “dosing spoon” to fill your portafilter basket with the right amount of coffee.

Welcome to Haven Coffee & Espresso Bar Located in the Town of Newburgh, Haven Coffee & Espresso Bar has become a local favorite for fresh and homemade fare. Using as many local ingredients as we are able, we’re committed to preserving the memories of the generations past as we update them for today’s palette.   At Haven, you’ll always have ample choices that are made fresh and without preservatives. We enjoy knowing exactly what’s in our food, and think that you should too.   We welcome you to stop in to pick up one of our delicious meals or desserts and if you have the time, join us in our dining room while you catch up with friends.   Don’t forget, we have free wi-fi, and plenty of coffee! // /* */   Make yourself at home in one of our spacious booths and discover what sets us apart from the crowd. Enjoy the free Wi-Fi.  Stay and work or sit and enjoy the handmade food!     We look forward to welcoming you here soon!

Next, if you are going to make a cappuccino or a latte with your espresso, you will need to froth or steam milk. So you’ll need a frothing pitcher. For home espresso machines, you will only need a small 12-ounce frothing pitcher. You will NOT use a large frothing pitcher. It won’t fit, and home machines cannot froth that much milk at once.

Trying to make good espresso at home is often fraught with buyer's remorse. It's easy to be seduced by the promise of a $100 machine advertising “up to 15 bars of pressure!!” These machines lack pressure regulation that would maintain 9 bars of pressure throughout the whole shot (20-30 seconds). Nespresso and other pod machines are convenient, but cannot produce quality espresso. Not only do they lack the proper mechanics, but the coffee is of poor quality and pre-ground.

To make your espresso machine useable at home, it’s best to set up a little station with your espresso machine out of the way of your cooking area, and perhaps out of the kitchen. If you have a dining room, setting up your machine on a counter in there is best. Same for in a den, or on the counter in a breakfast nook.

To make your espresso, you’ll then put the ground coffee (ALL of it: 14 grams) into the portafilter of your espresso machine. You HAVE TO tamp the coffee firmly into the portafilter to compress it and get a good extraction. You cannot simply use your machine without tamping. You want your extraction to take 20-25 seconds. If it is not tamped, it won’t extract correctly.

So far, we’ve measured out 14 grams of beans, ground them, put them in the portafilter, and tamped them into the portafilter. Now you’ll lock the portafilter into your espresso machine, and you are ready to extract your espresso.

The name of the game in a good espresso machine is stability. Any fluctuation in heat, even to the tune of a couple of degrees Farenheit, can alter the taste of the coffee and make it impossible to pull consistently good shots. High-end espresso machines rely on a few important mechanisms for maintaining heat and pressure throughout the brewing process.

For many, espresso, and coffee in general, is purely functional. A pick-me-up. Obsessing over things like mouthfeel, crema color, and grind size will always seem ridiculous to the vast majority. But once you get a taste of a truly remarkable espresso, it’s hard not to seek more.

Home is a cute shop. I'd walked past it a few times but never gone in. The staff are super nice, especially the owner and the cutie pie waiter. The menu is written on the tile walls and the glass cabinet has some tasty stuff in it. Bread oriented cafes reek of familiarity because Melbournites are ridiculous carbed up bread pigs and the market caters for that. I order the iced coffee. 'Wow $2.50 that's cheap.' But Mimi has the wrong idea about the drink. About what it is. 'Meme.' I gesture at the waiter 'preparing' the iced coffee, which involves releasing it from the tap of a four gallon bucket. 'What the f*#*k?' She breathes. Yes in New York iced coffee is made in bulk. It's put in a bucket where it sits until someone releases it into your cup. There's no ice-cream and no cream. That's why the thing is cheap. That's why I started drinking coffee. We are the only customers but it takes them a long time to prepare the food. When it arrives it's virtually inedible. Dry like cardboard. But I eat it anyway then we complain to each other. I won't ever eat at Home Espresso Bar again. However because the staff are really nice I imagine I will drink their bucket coffee again.

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