Home Bar Glassware

responsive

Home Bar Glassware

Food & Drink The Guide to Essential Home Bar Glassware Part 1: Straight-Up Written by Sam Slaughter — Posted on 3.07.17 43 shares Tweet Pin It When you’re building a home bar, not only do you need the right (and enough) booze, but you need the proper glasses to drink it out of. Sure, you can live your life singing about and drinking from your red Solo cups, but come on. Do you really want to be that guy? Since you don’t want to be that guy, you’re going to want to invest in some glassware for your home bar. In this piece, we’re going to be looking at the glasses that you’ll want for when you’re drinking straight-up. You might not need all of these, but having a variety will help accommodate any number of palates and choices that guests may make when you have them over.  (In addition, some of these glasses, like pints, wine glasses, and brandy snifters, can be used for cocktails as well as drinking something straight.) As far as how many, think about your own entertaining. Is it normally you and a partner? Are you inviting your guy friends over? At least two is good, but think about what you need and make a guess from there. Pint Glass If you’re going to drink beer, you’re going to want pint glasses. While you can drink straight out of a bottle or can and while, in the past few years, there have been a variety of glasses designed for specific types of beer, having a couple pint glasses around are a solid option for just about any beer. Wine Glasses (Red, White, and Sparkling) Another staple, wine glasses come in two general shapes—one made for white wine (a little taller) and one made for red wine (more balloon-shaped). You can also choose from several different sizes (ranging from around eight ounces up to as many as twenty) and styles (stemless, for instance), but having a couple wine glasses for each kind will really help when you’re trying to get the most out of your vino. In addition, sparkling wine glasses are handy as they are designed to get the most out of your bubbly. Shot Glass   A multi-purpose glass, the shot glass is good for everything from measuring for cocktails to pouring one out when you plan on slamming it down. Need we say more? Sherry Glass Sherry glasses usually hold three or four ounces, and are ideal for aperitifs, digestifs, and cordials. In addition, obviously, they are intended to hold sherries and other fortified wines, such as ports. Glencairn Glass If you’ve ever been to a whisky tasting, chances are you’ve used a Glencairn glass. They look like what would happen if a shot glass and a brandy snifter had a night of fun together, and they are great for drinking whiskey of all sorts. The design allows you to nose your whiskey in the proper way while still holding a healthy dram worth of the good stuff. Cordial Glass Cordial glasses, also known as liqueur glasses, are one-ounce in sized and come in a variety of shapes, almost all usually accompanied by long stems. They are used to serve, as you’ve probably already guessed, cordials and liqueurs. Brandy Snifter  A commanding presence on any shelf of glassware, a brandy snifter is designed so that your hand can warm the brandy inside. The rim of the glass is narrower than the bowl so that the aromas released by the slight warming stay trapped in the glass. This is also a great option for serving whiskies and other high-end spirits.  

Home Bar Glassware

You have the hardware. You bought the booze. You picked up the mixers. Your home bar is almost complete. Now you just need glassware. When considering glassware, it’s easy to get overwhelmed or obsess over having the proper glass for every occasion. My advice is to start small. This is a home bar, after all. No one’s going to write a nasty Yelp review if you don’t serve the Macallan in a Glencairn. Over time you can build a collection (glass sets make great gifts), but don’t feel like you need to be fully stocked right out of the gate. Still, it’s a good idea to have a few of the following glasses in your cupboard. Tumbler Tumblers come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Also known as rocks or old fashioned glasses, a good set of these will get a lot of use. They’re perfect for serving spirits neat or cocktails like Sazeracs and old fashioneds. I prefer thick-bottomed tumblers that have a little heft to them — they don’t spill and they feel good in your hand. I also like them larger than the classic style so they can double as a highball for gin and tonics and the like. Coupe Coupes have a classic look that makes your at-home cocktails look as dapper as anything you’ll find at a New York speakeasy. (Fun fact: According to legend, the design was modeled on the breast of Marie Antoinette.) They’re also super versatile. Not only are coupes an acceptable alternative to flutes for champagne, they also work for most classic “up” drinks like Sidecars, Aviations, Manhattans, and even Martinis. Cocktail While the coupes work just fine, it’s hard to argue with the iconic look of a martini in a tall cocktail glass. Just try to resist the urge to buy those ridiculous fishbowl-sized ones; you know it won’t end well. Flute Again, coupes are kosher, but if you’re a big mimosa drinker, you might want some deeper flutes for brunch-time entertaining. Collins/Highball This is your classic mixed drink glass. If your tumblers are big enough, you probably don’t need these guys. Still, their tall, skinny design makes a great presentation for everything from vodka tonics to an Americano. Wine Goblet Unless you’re a big-time oenophile, don’t over think wine glass etiquette. Invest in a set of at least six wine goblets, and pour away. You can also find a set of stemless wine glasses that work for both red and white. Pilsner Ditch those branded pint glasses you’ve been stealing since college, and pick up a respectable set of pilsners. With all the great beer out there, it’s a shame to waste it in generic glassware. Pitcher A decent sized pitcher is good to have when you’re making batches of cocktails. Be sure to get something sturdy, but not too heavy, since it will be moving around a lot. Shot As much as you might resist, there will be a night when shots are in order. So be prepared. But since we’re adults now, you should have something classier than those random glasses you brought home from Cancun during spring break six years ago. Get a cheap set of 4 or 6, and you’re good to go. Copper Mugs It’s a total splurge, but it really is the best way to drink a Moscow Mule. But don’t stop there; that cold metal is great for any mixed drink on a hot summer day. Jim Sabataso is a writer, part-time bartender, and full-time cocktail enthusiast living in Vermont. Follow him on Twitter @JimSabataso.

Home Bar Glassware

responsive

There are several other glasses, not covered here, that you may find of use. The website Cocktail Kingdom is a good option for rounding out your selection of glassware and bar equipment without breaking the bank. It may take a while to complete your collection, but the results are worth it. One final note: It’s important to remember that it’s not enough to simply own the glassware and toss it in a cabinet. You must keep it clean – free of dust and assorted schmutz. There are few sights so handsome in a home bar as a tidy shelf of gleaming glassware, and few so disappointing as unlooked-for flotsam in an otherwise artfully prepared beverage.

Home Bar Glassware

When you’re building a home bar, not only do you need the right (and enough) booze, but you need the proper glasses to drink it out of. Sure, you can live your life singing about and drinking from your red Solo cups, but come on. Do you really want to be that guy? Since you don’t want to be that guy, you’re going to want to invest in some glassware for your home bar. In this piece, we’re going to be looking at the glasses that you’ll want for when you’re drinking straight-up. You might not need all of these, but having a variety will help accommodate any number of palates and choices that guests may make when you have them over.  (In addition, some of these glasses, like pints, wine glasses, and brandy snifters, can be used for cocktails as well as drinking something straight.) As far as how many, think about your own entertaining. Is it normally you and a partner? Are you inviting your guy friends over? At least two is good, but think about what you need and make a guess from there. Pint Glass If you’re going to drink beer, you’re going to want pint glasses. While you can drink straight out of a bottle or can and while, in the past few years, there have been a variety of glasses designed for specific types of beer, having a couple pint glasses around are a solid option for just about any beer. Wine Glasses (Red, White, and Sparkling) Another staple, wine glasses come in two general shapes—one made for white wine (a little taller) and one made for red wine (more balloon-shaped). You can also choose from several different sizes (ranging from around eight ounces up to as many as twenty) and styles (stemless, for instance), but having a couple wine glasses for each kind will really help when you’re trying to get the most out of your vino. In addition, sparkling wine glasses are handy as they are designed to get the most out of your bubbly. Shot Glass   A multi-purpose glass, the shot glass is good for everything from measuring for cocktails to pouring one out when you plan on slamming it down. Need we say more? Sherry Glass Sherry glasses usually hold three or four ounces, and are ideal for aperitifs, digestifs, and cordials. In addition, obviously, they are intended to hold sherries and other fortified wines, such as ports. Glencairn Glass If you’ve ever been to a whisky tasting, chances are you’ve used a Glencairn glass. They look like what would happen if a shot glass and a brandy snifter had a night of fun together, and they are great for drinking whiskey of all sorts. The design allows you to nose your whiskey in the proper way while still holding a healthy dram worth of the good stuff. Cordial Glass Cordial glasses, also known as liqueur glasses, are one-ounce in sized and come in a variety of shapes, almost all usually accompanied by long stems. They are used to serve, as you’ve probably already guessed, cordials and liqueurs. Brandy Snifter  A commanding presence on any shelf of glassware, a brandy snifter is designed so that your hand can warm the brandy inside. The rim of the glass is narrower than the bowl so that the aromas released by the slight warming stay trapped in the glass. This is also a great option for serving whiskies and other high-end spirits.  

Home Bar Glassware

Home Bar Glassware

responsive

Home Bar Glassware