Free Home Bar Plans

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Free Home Bar Plans

Print off one of these free bar plans to help you build the home bar you've always dreamed of. There are free bar plans for indoor bars, outdoor bars, and even tiki bars, to help you get just the style you're looking for.Building a home bar can be a simple project and pretty budget friendly. The free bar plans all include building directions, diagrams, material lists, tool lists, photos, and some even include videos.After you've used these bar plans to build you dream bar, how about using a wine rack plan to give you even more storage space? You may also want to use some free woodworking plans to build a dining room table, farmhouse table, entertainment center, bookcase, coffee table, kitchen islands, shed, pergola, or even a picnic table.

Free Home Bar Plans

We proudly offer many types and styles of professionally designed commercial and Home bar woodworking plans, pergola arbor plans, outdoor table plans, and outdoor bar plans. Our collection will soon include curios, book cases, gun cabinets & other plans. Whether a woodworking professional or a Do-It-Yourselfer, you will find our plans to be of the highest quality available anywhere. We have the largest selection of bar plans on the internet. We stand behind every plan we sell.

Free Home Bar Plans

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To commemorate our 10 year anniversary, we are making our Official HomeWetBar.com wet bar plans free! Yes, you heard that right! The famous home bar plans  that started it all are now free. It’s our way of saying thanks for the last 10 years of providing you with the most unique and fun items on the internet. Whether you chose to build a basement bar, an indoor bar, or modify these plans into a tiki bar, we hope you have as much fun building your own bar as we had making the original. Cheers!

Free Home Bar Plans

Our plans for how to build a bar would be complete without a liquor cabinet now would they! For the inside of the bar where the fish tank sits I cut ½” plywood (2 pieces – 23”x 34 ½”) and attached it to the 2x4s on both sides of the tank area to make walls in the bar. (Picture 6b) I then made shelves using 1×2 pine screwed into the 2x4s to form the base and then ½ plywood to make the shelf itself. (Pictures 6a & 6b) I then used 1×2 pine to make rails so the liquor would not fall out of our home bar from the back of the shelf and ½ x 2 pine to make the front rail that keeps the liquor from falling out when you open the doors. You can see this in Picture 6a; it is of the left side of the bar (liquor cabinet side). Take care when making your shelf for the right side, make sure you line it up so the fish tank will be visible only, and no other space will be showing. Now you need to sand and stain the inside of the bar, and then apply 3 coats of the waterproof sealant to the wood. Finally, put in the window from the backside of the bar, it is just 1/4” thick glass custom cut for the hole in my bar (11”x 19½”) by a local glass shop. It is attached by see-thru calking applied to the back of the glass and plywood to form a tight, waterproof bond all the way around the glass.

Free Home Bar Plans

6 Free Home Bar Plan from Bob’s Woodworking Plans The finished result of this free home bar plan is a classic 6-foot bar that features an oak arm rest and a brass foot rail. There's plenty of room on the inside of the bar for storage with drawers, shelves, and a wine rack.Download a PDF of this free home bar plan and you'll have over 40 pages packed with directions, a materials list, diagrams, and photos. More

Free Home Bar Plans

8 Free Bar Plan from Canply Here's a PDF file of a free bar plan that will build you a great home bar appropriate for your basement or any other room in your home. This is a free standing bar that's built from plywood.A materials list, construction notes, building hints, and diagrams are all included in this free bar plan. More

Free Home Bar Plans

Curves Some suppliers carry curved bar molding. But curves are costly; this radius corner was $150. Mitered corners are much cheaper! Prop it up for miters The underside of most bar molding tilts downward when installed. So you can’t just lay it on the saw bed when you make angled cuts. Instead, set the molding on blocks to hold it at the correct tilt. (You can lay the molding flat to make 90-degree cuts, however.) Tape the molding to limit tear-out where the saw teeth exit the wood. “Clamp” it with screws Bar molding is almost impossible to clamp in place. So do some test fitting, fastening it with screws from below. Make sure all the joints are aligned and snug, then remove the screws, add glue and drive the screws back in. Fill in dead ends The butt end of bar molding leaves you with exposed rabbets. Some suppliers sell end caps, which are easy to install but look awkward. So here’s a better solution: Run the bar molding about 5/8 in. past the back edge of the bar top. Then fill the rabbets with blocks cut from wood with a similar grain pattern. Hold the blocks in place for about a minute. After the glue has completely dried, sand the end flush and add the drip lip. The lip shown here is simply a homemade strip of wood, 3/8 in. thick with rounded edges. The photo shows it installed. Seal the end grain With bar molding, you get a large area of exposed end grain. The end grain of wood sucks up more stain than the face grain and turns out a lot darker—almost black if you’re using a dark stain. To prevent that, pretreat the end grain with sealer, which will partially fill the pores. A couple of ounces of polyurethane mixed with a couple of tablespoons of thinner (water or mineral spirits, depending on the type of polyurethane) works well. If you slop seal onto the face grain, sand it off.

Free Home Bar Plans

Building a great basement bar starts with a sturdy base. It is arguably the most important thing when building a bar, the stability of the entire bar depends on it. As you can see from picture 1a I chose to make my bar in two pieces so it could be transported if I ever choose to move. Each section is actually a little bit smaller than the main door opening in standard home so it can be moved through the door easily. NOTE: These same dimensions should work for you as well, but it would be wise to measure your door and compare it to the dimensions on the diagrams to be certain that each of the bar sides will fit through the outside door in your home. (A 30” wide doorway is required for the dimensions of this homemade bar.)

7 Pottery Barn Inspired Chesapeake Bar Cabinet Plan from The Design Confidential This free bar plan is inspired by Pottery Barn's Chesapeake Bar. This outdoor bar has a fold down top and sides that open allowing you to keep your bar stocked at all times.Diagrams, instructions, and a materials and tools list will help you along each step of the way of building this outdoor bar. More

Print off one of these free bar plans to help you build the home bar you've always dreamed of. There are free bar plans for indoor bars, outdoor bars, and even tiki bars, to help you get just the style you're looking for.

2 Rolling Bar Cart Plan from Ana White Ana White  A rolling bar cart is a great alternative to your standard home bar and this one can be used both inside and out. With a large shelf, a towel bar, and wheels you can finish it in any color you want.These are complete building plans that include everything you need to build this basic bar project for less than $50. More

Here's a PDF file of a free bar plan that will build you a great home bar appropriate for your basement or any other room in your home. This is a free standing bar that's built from plywood.A materials list, construction notes, building hints, and diagrams are all included in this free bar plan. More

Our bar plans call for two layers of plywood to give it strength. The idea for the bar skin is that the interior ¾” plywood will give it plenty of strength, and the more expensive ¼”redwood exterior will give it beauty. The diy bar top is simply cut to the length of the upper horizontal 2x4s. The easiest way to measure the top is to just set the each side of the bar base on a large piece of plywood, outline it, and then add 5” to all of the front side measurements and then cut out the new dimensions. But if you are off even a little bit the top will not fit properly so I suggest you measure to the end of all of your 2x4s and compare those measurements to those on outline to make sure they are the same. You could even go as far as laying the plywood on top of the bar and using a ruler to trace lines underneath to outline where you need to cut if the other methods don’t work for you. To attach the plywood top you need to drill holes down trough the plywood into the 2x4s. Then, glue the plywood to the 2x4s and fasten the plywood to the 2x4s with 1 5/8” screws. Use clamps to hold the top down while drying. (Pictures 2c and 2d)

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