Essential Home Bar Supplies

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Essential Home Bar Supplies

Home > Bartender guide Bartender guide Each section is divided into parts. Section one covers the a more basic understanding of bartending and advices on setting up a small or home bar. Section two is for learning both important terminology and standard, popular recipes, as well as some advice on professional conduct. Section The Basics browse this section only 1.1 Bar Stock Underlines essential bar ingredients with a listing of our most commonly used. 1.2 Bar Equipment A listing with descriptions of essential bar equipment. 1.3 Glasses & Containers Measurements, descriptions and uses of various glassware. 1.3.1 Spills, Breakage and Handling 1.4 Basic Techniques Essential techniques for mixing cocktails. 1.4.1 Measurements 1.4.2 Decoration Section Essential Knowledge browse this section only 2.1 Terminology Drinks and phrases you’re likely to encounter quickly. 2.2 Essential Recipes Cocktail recipes you really need to know from the start. 2.2.1 General Rules 2.3 Hygiene and Safety A few guidelines to remember on hygiene and safety in a bar.

Essential Home Bar Supplies

Home Bar Rule #1: Pick alcohol you actually enjoy imbibing. When I first started my own home bar, I only picked spirits that I thought would impress guests when I had them over. I ended up spending a fortune for alcohol that I hardly ever used. While you’ll use your home bar for entertaining, don’t forget that a home bar’s main customer is you. When you mix yourself a cocktail to sip on the weekends while you sit on the patio with your dog, you want to enjoy it. The dog doesn’t care what your favorite gin is. That is of course if this pooch isn’t your dog. He’s so smug.

Essential Home Bar Supplies

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Master mixologist Eben FreemanBefore you spend your entire paycheck trying to collect an impressive array of bottles that you may only use sparingly for your home bar, consider starting out with just the basics. Having the essential tools you need will allow you to make a variety of cocktails, and look like a master barman while doing so. Business Insider got the inside scoop on the must-have tools and ingredients from Eben Freeman, master mixologist and director of beverage operations for chef Michael White’s AltaMarea group. So go on and impress your guests. Take a look at the 9 home bar must-haves > » View As: One Page Slides Take a look at the 9 home bar must-haves > »

Essential Home Bar Supplies

Remember Home Bar Rule #2: Start small. If you don’t have room or any place to store your home bar, keep your home bar small. Pick two or three different liquors and stick with those. When I was in an apartment, I kept my small bar in a cabinet above the fridge, and I kept my mixers and garnishes in the fridge.

Essential Home Bar Supplies

If you do move into a bigger place and you’ve really enjoyed being a home mixologist, then I can’t recommend installing a permanent home bar in your home enough. Many homes today come with wet bars and storage space for a home bar. If you don’t have that, with a little initiative and sweat, you can install your own bar in an unused room in the house.

Essential Home Bar Supplies

If you’d like something a bit more distinguished than your kitchen cabinet to serve as the home for your home bar, consider getting a cocktail cabinet or mini bar. They’re small pieces of handsome furniture that you can usually put up against the wall. They’re nice because they can serve as a gathering point without having a huge bar installed in your home. Cocktail cabinets take up very little space, but can hold quite a bit of alcohol and glassware. I have friend who picked up a vintage cocktail cabinet at the antique store. It was a bit rough, but with a bit of elbow grease he was able to spruce it up. Here’s a nice example of a retro cocktail cabinet from the 50s:

Essential Home Bar Supplies

7 of 9 The Mixers Cointreau A bar essential — clean, full of natural orange flavor, and not too sweet. Red Vermouth For Manhattans. White Vermouth Essential for truly sublime martinis. Bitters Bitters are used not to make the drink taste bitter but to help other flavors blend.

Essential Home Bar Supplies

Cointreau A bar essential — clean, full of natural orange flavor, and not too sweet. Red Vermouth For Manhattans. White Vermouth Essential for truly sublime martinis. Bitters Bitters are used not to make the drink taste bitter but to help other flavors blend.

It’s hard to say how many times we’ve started to make a drink at a friend’s party, only to realize that we’re missing a muddler or a strainer. And while we’re no strangers to getting creative to solve the problem, why not make sure you’re prepared next time? A while back, we asked our Facebook fans what tools and other supplies they thought was most often missing from home bars. We got more than 150 responses—everything from cocktail shakers to corkscrews—but there were a few that really stood out. And it’s not all bar tools. So no matter if you’re making complicated cocktails or are just looking to ramp up your whiskey-drinking game, we rounded up 10 essentials you should always have on hand.

It might feel like a home bar should have one of everything, but the best way to stock your bar is to start with the cocktails you love to drink. Plan your cocktail shopping the way you plan your meal shopping. If, say, you’re making a lasagna, you’ll make a list of the things you need for that, and you’ll shop accordingly. So when you want lasagna, you buy what you need for the lasagna; why buy ribeye steaks and turkey breast and spare ribs when all you really want is lasagna?

4 & 5. Tequila (Silver & Gold)The good folks at 12 Bottle Bar have based an entire cocktail blog on the idea that a good bar can be complete with only 12 bottles. Tequila, however, was left off the list. Their justification? The only classic cocktail you can make with tequila is a margarita. Right – but where would we be without margaritas? (Look for bottles labeled “100 percent de agave” – anything else contains ‘fillers’ made from tequila-flavored grain alcohol. Gross.)

Now of course, in the kitchen, it helps to always have some pantry staples around, such as various dried beans, pasta, canned tomatoes, spices, and so on. In the same way, it’s always good to have bar staples around. The two most important bar staples are bitters and simple syrup. The latter’s easy. Add one part water and two parts sugar to a saucepan, heat it long enough for the sugar to dissolve, and then let it cool long enough to be bottled.

Also, you don’t have to have your bar always stocked and prepared for a big party. When you host a party, stock up your bar to fill your needs. When you’re not anticipating a party, there’s no need to have gallons of tonic water or dozens of lime wedges on hand.

Bar Spoon No matter if you’re stirring a Manhattan or Martini, or floating wine atop a New York Sour, you’ll need a long-handled bar spoon. (And no, your typical tea spoon won’t cut it—too short and too wide). Go double-duty by choosing a spoon with fork-like tines on the handle end, which makes spearing cherries or olives out of the jar a breeze. Try this: Trident Barspoon

9 of 9 The Nonalcoholic Bar No one should be punished for passing up a cocktail, but if plain soda and canned juice are the only alternatives, an abstainer is likely to wind up pouting in the corner. Fortunately, there are enough flavorful nonalcoholic beverages to fill an entire bar and bring cheer to the soberest of souls. Mix fresh-squeezed orange or grapefruit juice with a splash of seltzer to make a light cocktail. Also try sweetened, diluted lime and lemon juice served over crushed ice, or whip fresh or frozen berries in a blender with ice and a dash of lime. Get our Nonalcoholic Drink Recipes

For the gentleman who enjoys entertaining, a properly stocked bar is a must. A well-mixed drink can help schmooze a boss, romance a date, and impress a friend. Mixing drinks at home for friends and family makes me feel like some swanky 1960s gentleman pouring drinks in his Space Age-inspired mid-century home. I love that feeling.

Home > Bartender guide Bartender guide Each section is divided into parts. Section one covers the a more basic understanding of bartending and advices on setting up a small or home bar. Section two is for learning both important terminology and standard, popular recipes, as well as some advice on professional conduct.

This bartender essential was one of the most mentioned by Facebook fans when we asked what home mixologists were missing. If you have a jigger for accurate measurement, pour spouts are definitely easy to go without, but they do help ensure that you don’t spill any of your precious booze, and they’re dirt-cheap.

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