English Home Bar

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English Home Bar

One of the first considerations in starting your bar project is to either work around a specific bar theme or stick with a classic home bar. As a starter, we’ve classified project by their relative stylke as it relates to the four seasons, check out theses bar style sample by season: Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall. If you need more ideas for a bar theme, see the list below or just focus on a favorite nightlife activity, possibly a dance club, casino, sports bar, biker bar or anything that literally floats your boat….or even sinks your boat.

English Home Bar

In Australia, the major form of licensed commercial alcohol outlet from the colonial period to the present was the pub, a local variant of the English original. Until the 1970s, Australian pubs were traditionally organised into gender-segregated drinking areas—the “public bar” was only open to men, while the “lounge bar” or “saloon bar” served both men and women (i.e. mixed drinking). This distinction was gradually eliminated as anti-discrimination legislation and women’s rights activism broke down the concept of a public drinking area accessible to only men. Where two bars still exist in the one establishment, one (that derived from the “public bar”) will be more downmarket while the other (deriving from the “lounge bar”) will be more upmarket. Over time, with the introduction of gaming machines into hotels, many “lounge bars” have or are being converted into gaming rooms.

English Home Bar

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The term “bar” is derived from the specialized counter on which drinks are served. Patrons may sit or stand at the bar and be served by the bartender. Depending on the size of a bar and its approach, alcohol may be served at the bar by bartenders, at tables by servers, or by a combination of the two. The “back bar” is a set of shelves of glasses and bottles behind that counter. In some establishments, the back bar is elaborately decorated with woodwork, etched glass, mirrors, and lights.

English Home Bar

A bar’s owners and managers choose the bar’s name, décor, drink menu, lighting, and other elements which they think will attract a certain kind of patron. However, they have only limited influence over who patronizes their establishment. Thus, a bar originally intended for one demographic profile can become popular with another. For example, a gay bar with a dance or disco floor might, over time, attract an increasingly heterosexual clientele. Or a blues bar may become a biker bar if most its patrons are bikers.

English Home Bar

A bar (also known as a saloon or a tavern or sometimes a pub or club, referring to the actual establishment, as in pub bar or savage club etc.) is a retail business establishment that serves alcoholic beverages, such as beer, wine, liquor, cocktails, and other beverages such as mineral water and soft drinks and often sell snack foods such as crisps (potato chips) or peanuts, for consumption on premises. Some types of bars, such as pubs, may also serve food from a restaurant menu. The term “bar” also refers to the countertop and area where drinks are served.

English Home Bar

Canada has adopted some of the newer U.S. bar traditions (such as the “sports bar”) of the last decades. As a result, the term “bar” has come to be differentiated from the term “pub”, in that bars are usually ‘themed’ and sometimes have a dance floor. Bars with dance floors are usually relegated to small or Suburban communities. In larger cities bars with large dance floors are usually referred to as clubs and are strictly for dancing, Establishments which call themselves pubs are often much more similar to a British pub in style. Before the 1980s, most “bars” were referred to simply as “tavern”.

English Home Bar

Spain is the country with the highest ratio of bars/population with almost 6 bars per thousand inhabitants, that’s 3 times UK’s ratio and 4 times Germany’s, and it alone has double the number of bars than the oldest of the 15-members of the European Union. The meaning of the word ‘bar’ in Spain, however, does not have the negative connotation inherent in the same word in many other languages. For Spanish people a bar is essentially a meeting place, and not necessarily a place to engage in the consumption of alcoholic beverages. As a result, children are normally allowed into bars, and it is common to see families in bars during week-ends of the end of the day. In small towns, the ‘bar’ may constitute the very center of social life, and it is customary that, after social events, people go to bars, including seniors and children alike.

English Home Bar

‘Bar’ also designates a separate drinking area within a pub. Until recent years most pubs had two or more bars – very often the Public bar or Tap room, and the Saloon Bar or Lounge, where the decor was better and prices were sometimes higher. The designations of the bars varied regionally. In the last two decades, many pub interiors have been opened up into single spaces, which some people regret as it loses the flexibility, intimacy, and traditional feel of a multi-roomed public house.

A special type of bar is one that serves only one type of meal. The example are bars serving pasztecik szczeciński, a traditional specialty of the city of Szczecin, served as fast food. Customers can consume pasztecik szczeciński in a bar or take it to home or for a walk through the city.

Laws in many jurisdictions prohibit minors from entering a bar. If those under legal drinking age are allowed to enter, as is the case with pubs that serve food, they are not allowed to drink. In some jurisdictions, bars cannot serve a patron who is already intoxicated. Cities and towns usually have legal restrictions on where bars may be located and on the types of alcohol they may serve to their customers. Some bars may have a license to serve beer and wine, but not hard liquor. In some jurisdictions, patrons buying alcohol must also order food. In some jurisdictions, bar owners have a legal liability for the conduct of patrons who they serve (this liability may arise in cases of driving under the influence which cause injuries or deaths).

8.8 “Just Like Home” • Leisure trip • Solo traveler • Double Room • Stayed 1 night • Submitted from a mobile device 눇Home bar is true to its name, the owners are very nice and you immediately feel like home, especially when the cutest dog, Princess, welcomes you on your arrival.

In the all-pine space with a custom-made bar top, the owner watches sports, plays pool, entertains a few friends and has big parties. “This is the man cave,” Crisp says. “The homeowner wouldn’t call it that, but that’s what it ends up being.”.

A few more theme ideas might be a cool bar pub in your basement, garage, apartment, college frat house, dorm room, cottage, beach, tiki, patio, pool side, indoors or outdoors. Just about anywhere.

There have been many different names for public drinking spaces throughout history. In the colonial era of the United States taverns were an important meeting place, as most other institutions were weak. During the 19th century saloons were very important to the leisure time of the working class. Today, even when an establishment uses a different name, such as “tavern” or “saloon”, the area of the establishment where the bartender pours or mixes beverages is normally called “the bar.”

A beer bar focuses on beer, particularly craft beer, rather than on wine or liquor. A brew pub has an on-site brewery and serves craft beers.

The counter at which drinks are served by a bartender is called “the bar”. This term is applied, as a synecdoche, to drinking establishments called “bars”. This counter typically stores a variety of beers, wines, liquors, and non-alcoholic ingredients, and is organized to facilitate the bartender’s work.

Beginning in the mid-1950s, the formerly strict state liquor licensing laws were progressively relaxed and reformed, with the result that pub trading hours were extended. This was in part to eliminate the social problems associated with early closing times—notably the infamous “six o’clock swill”—and the thriving trade in “sly grog” (illicit alcohol sales). More licensed liquor outlets began to appear, including retail “bottle shops” (over-the-counter bottle sales were previously only available at pubs and were strictly controlled). Particularly in Sydney, a new class of licensed premises, the wine bar, appeared; there alcohol could be served on the proviso that it was provided in tandem with a meal. These venues became very popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s and many offered free entertainment, becoming an important facet of the Sydney music scene in that period.

Since the end of the Second World War, and exposure by roughly one million Canadians to the public house traditions common in the UK by servicemen and women serving there, those traditions became more common in Canada. These traditions include the drinking of dark ales and stouts, the “pub” as a social gathering place for both sexes, and the playing of games (such as darts, snooker or pool). Tavern became extremely popular during the 1960s and 1970s, especially for working-class people. Canadian taverns, which can still be found in remote regions of Northern Canada, have long tables with benches lining the sides. Patrons in these taverns often order beer in large quart bottles and drink inexpensive “bar brand” Canadian rye whisky. In some provinces, taverns used to have separate entrances for men and women. Even in a large city like Toronto the separate entrances existed into the early 1970s.

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