Diy Home Bar

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Diy Home Bar

Next Up How to Build a Tiki Bar Take outdoor entertaining to new heights by building a backyard tiki bar with bamboo accents and a thatched roof. How to Build a Backyard Bar Create a swanky space with some cleaning, repurposing and a new slate countertop. How to Build a Rustic Dry Bar Add a bit of history to a household space by designing and building a useful DIY cabinet from reclaimed and rustic materials. How to Build an Outdoor Bar and Grill Learn how to turn a plain backyard barbecue into a distinctive kitchen that features a stone outdoor bar and grill. How to Create a Raised Bar in Your Kitchen A raised breakfast bar separates your work zone from your entertaining areas, plus it covers kitchen clutter or dirty dishes in the sink. Follow these steps to build a raised bar in your kitchen. How to Install a Wet Bar Sink Use these step-by-step instructions to easily install a wet bar sink. How to Build Simple Stairs Stairs are the number-one way to get from one level of a building to another. Fortunately, they’re simple to install with these basic step-by-step instructions. How to Build Staircase Balusters and Newel Posts Make a new staircase by building new baluster spindles and newel posts. How to Build Exterior Stairs Learn how to build an exterior stairs using pressure-treated wood and galvanized (rust-proof) hardware to combat rot, rust and other damage from water and weather. How to Build a Valet Cabinet Wasted Spaces host Karl Champley shows you how to make the most of an ineffective alcove by building a valet cabinet/pantry.

Diy Home Bar

How to Build a Tiki Bar Take outdoor entertaining to new heights by building a backyard tiki bar with bamboo accents and a thatched roof. How to Build a Backyard Bar Create a swanky space with some cleaning, repurposing and a new slate countertop. How to Build a Rustic Dry Bar Add a bit of history to a household space by designing and building a useful DIY cabinet from reclaimed and rustic materials. How to Build an Outdoor Bar and Grill Learn how to turn a plain backyard barbecue into a distinctive kitchen that features a stone outdoor bar and grill. How to Create a Raised Bar in Your Kitchen A raised breakfast bar separates your work zone from your entertaining areas, plus it covers kitchen clutter or dirty dishes in the sink. Follow these steps to build a raised bar in your kitchen. How to Install a Wet Bar Sink Use these step-by-step instructions to easily install a wet bar sink. How to Build Simple Stairs Stairs are the number-one way to get from one level of a building to another. Fortunately, they’re simple to install with these basic step-by-step instructions. How to Build Staircase Balusters and Newel Posts Make a new staircase by building new baluster spindles and newel posts. How to Build Exterior Stairs Learn how to build an exterior stairs using pressure-treated wood and galvanized (rust-proof) hardware to combat rot, rust and other damage from water and weather. How to Build a Valet Cabinet Wasted Spaces host Karl Champley shows you how to make the most of an ineffective alcove by building a valet cabinet/pantry.

Diy Home Bar

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Curves Some suppliers carry curved bar molding. But curves are costly; this radius corner was $150. Mitered corners are much cheaper! Prop it up for miters The underside of most bar molding tilts downward when installed. So you can’t just lay it on the saw bed when you make angled cuts. Instead, set the molding on blocks to hold it at the correct tilt. (You can lay the molding flat to make 90-degree cuts, however.) Tape the molding to limit tear-out where the saw teeth exit the wood. “Clamp” it with screws Bar molding is almost impossible to clamp in place. So do some test fitting, fastening it with screws from below. Make sure all the joints are aligned and snug, then remove the screws, add glue and drive the screws back in. Fill in dead ends The butt end of bar molding leaves you with exposed rabbets. Some suppliers sell end caps, which are easy to install but look awkward. So here’s a better solution: Run the bar molding about 5/8 in. past the back edge of the bar top. Then fill the rabbets with blocks cut from wood with a similar grain pattern. Hold the blocks in place for about a minute. After the glue has completely dried, sand the end flush and add the drip lip. The lip shown here is simply a homemade strip of wood, 3/8 in. thick with rounded edges. The photo shows it installed. Seal the end grain With bar molding, you get a large area of exposed end grain. The end grain of wood sucks up more stain than the face grain and turns out a lot darker—almost black if you’re using a dark stain. To prevent that, pretreat the end grain with sealer, which will partially fill the pores. A couple of ounces of polyurethane mixed with a couple of tablespoons of thinner (water or mineral spirits, depending on the type of polyurethane) works well. If you slop seal onto the face grain, sand it off.

Diy Home Bar

After busy work, almost nothing is as relaxing as enjoying a drink. But not every home has a built-in home bar. Before you start shopping for ready made bars, why not consider concocting your own bar lets you bring out your personal style. This article we will present you 21 cool DIY home bar designs that can blow your mind. They are easy and need not too much money to build but can help you own a small and intimate bar. Have fun! For more on each, follow their link below the image.

Diy Home Bar

DIYers and pros share their design and how-to tips, with photos of reader-built home bars. Learn how to build a classic wood bar top, install a beer tap and more. By the DIY experts of The Family Handyman Magazine Home bars Stone bar Build in a drip tray Bar molding tips Mock it up Steel bar Granite top Advice on tap

Diy Home Bar

After a long day, almost nothing is as relaxing as enjoying a cocktail. If you like to unwind with a drink but don’t always like the stress or expense of going out on the town to get one, try setting up your own minibar. While there are plenty of options available to purchase, concocting your own bar lets you bring out your personal style. You can make a DIY bar from scratch or rely instead on easy upgrades to existing pieces. Whichever route you choose, the joy of constructing your own minibar is that you can customize it to your needs, whether your goal is to create more storage, display your liquor collection, or just provide a gathering spot for friends. Getting thirsty? Grab a drink, take a seat, and savor these 17 tempting ideas for a DIY minibar. By Cody Calamaio Expanded View >

Diy Home Bar

Wide bar, as seen on DIY Network’s original series, Man Caves. The color theme is orange and has a small bar area with bar stools and old framed photos above the counter.

Kelly and Co. Design created a contemporary-style bar in this renovated barn entertainment space without losing the ambiance of its rustic surroundings. A black granite countertop and zinc bar top sit atop wood cabinets and stainless steel fixtures. LED backlighting, which can be changed according to mood, showcases the bar selections. The bar features a keg tap, a wine fridge, a dishwasher, a refrigerator, and ample storage for glassware and other serving pieces.

Step 3 Building the Bar Build bar from one row of lower kitchen cabinets. Hang cabinets at highest point of floor. Install countertop of wood, granite, quartz, bamboo, concrete, even recycled glass. Pro Tip Match finish to existing finish or choose contrasting or companion finish. The longer the countertop, the more serving space. To determine high point of floor, run level beam across wall three inches up and measure down to floor every ten or twelve inches. Use shims to fill low spots. For a standing only bar, make the overhang 6 to 9 inches; for bar stools the overhang should be 12 inches.

Building the Bar Build bar from one row of lower kitchen cabinets. Hang cabinets at highest point of floor. Install countertop of wood, granite, quartz, bamboo, concrete, even recycled glass. Pro Tip Match finish to existing finish or choose contrasting or companion finish. The longer the countertop, the more serving space. To determine high point of floor, run level beam across wall three inches up and measure down to floor every ten or twelve inches. Use shims to fill low spots. For a standing only bar, make the overhang 6 to 9 inches; for bar stools the overhang should be 12 inches.

Decorating your very own home bar can be a daunting task. It’s your sacred space to unwind and naturally you want it to reflect your personality and taste. For those of you having a difficult time deciding which direction to take your home bar design, I reached into every corner of the internet to bring you the most clever and unique ideas to keep in mind when designing your favorite room. Whether you prefer a refined atmosphere, vintage, or rustic, there is a design for every imbiber! So grab a beer, whiskey, or glass of wine and get inspired because here are 71 totally unique ideas for decorating your home bar.

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