Building A Bar At Home

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Building A Bar At Home

Next Up How to Build a Tiki Bar Take outdoor entertaining to new heights by building a backyard tiki bar with bamboo accents and a thatched roof. How to Build a Backyard Bar Create a swanky space with some cleaning, repurposing and a new slate countertop. How to Build a Rustic Dry Bar Add a bit of history to a household space by designing and building a useful DIY cabinet from reclaimed and rustic materials. How to Build an Outdoor Bar and Grill Learn how to turn a plain backyard barbecue into a distinctive kitchen that features a stone outdoor bar and grill. How to Create a Raised Bar in Your Kitchen A raised breakfast bar separates your work zone from your entertaining areas, plus it covers kitchen clutter or dirty dishes in the sink. Follow these steps to build a raised bar in your kitchen. How to Install a Wet Bar Sink Use these step-by-step instructions to easily install a wet bar sink. How to Build Simple Stairs Stairs are the number-one way to get from one level of a building to another. Fortunately, they’re simple to install with these basic step-by-step instructions. How to Build Staircase Balusters and Newel Posts Make a new staircase by building new baluster spindles and newel posts. How to Build Exterior Stairs Learn how to build an exterior stairs using pressure-treated wood and galvanized (rust-proof) hardware to combat rot, rust and other damage from water and weather. How to Build a Valet Cabinet Wasted Spaces host Karl Champley shows you how to make the most of an ineffective alcove by building a valet cabinet/pantry.

Building A Bar At Home

How to Build a Tiki Bar Take outdoor entertaining to new heights by building a backyard tiki bar with bamboo accents and a thatched roof. How to Build a Backyard Bar Create a swanky space with some cleaning, repurposing and a new slate countertop. How to Build a Rustic Dry Bar Add a bit of history to a household space by designing and building a useful DIY cabinet from reclaimed and rustic materials. How to Build an Outdoor Bar and Grill Learn how to turn a plain backyard barbecue into a distinctive kitchen that features a stone outdoor bar and grill. How to Create a Raised Bar in Your Kitchen A raised breakfast bar separates your work zone from your entertaining areas, plus it covers kitchen clutter or dirty dishes in the sink. Follow these steps to build a raised bar in your kitchen. How to Install a Wet Bar Sink Use these step-by-step instructions to easily install a wet bar sink. How to Build Simple Stairs Stairs are the number-one way to get from one level of a building to another. Fortunately, they’re simple to install with these basic step-by-step instructions. How to Build Staircase Balusters and Newel Posts Make a new staircase by building new baluster spindles and newel posts. How to Build Exterior Stairs Learn how to build an exterior stairs using pressure-treated wood and galvanized (rust-proof) hardware to combat rot, rust and other damage from water and weather. How to Build a Valet Cabinet Wasted Spaces host Karl Champley shows you how to make the most of an ineffective alcove by building a valet cabinet/pantry.

Building A Bar At Home

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Print off one of these free bar plans to help you build the home bar you've always dreamed of. There are free bar plans for indoor bars, outdoor bars, and even tiki bars, to help you get just the style you're looking for.Building a home bar can be a simple project and pretty budget friendly. The free bar plans all include building directions, diagrams, material lists, tool lists, photos, and some even include videos.After you've used these bar plans to build you dream bar, how about using a wine rack plan to give you even more storage space? You may also want to use some free woodworking plans to build a dining room table, farmhouse table, entertainment center, bookcase, coffee table, kitchen islands, shed, pergola, or even a picnic table.

Building A Bar At Home

Our plans for how to build a bar would be complete without a liquor cabinet now would they! For the inside of the bar where the fish tank sits I cut ½” plywood (2 pieces – 23”x 34 ½”) and attached it to the 2x4s on both sides of the tank area to make walls in the bar. (Picture 6b) I then made shelves using 1×2 pine screwed into the 2x4s to form the base and then ½ plywood to make the shelf itself. (Pictures 6a & 6b) I then used 1×2 pine to make rails so the liquor would not fall out of our home bar from the back of the shelf and ½ x 2 pine to make the front rail that keeps the liquor from falling out when you open the doors. You can see this in Picture 6a; it is of the left side of the bar (liquor cabinet side). Take care when making your shelf for the right side, make sure you line it up so the fish tank will be visible only, and no other space will be showing. Now you need to sand and stain the inside of the bar, and then apply 3 coats of the waterproof sealant to the wood. Finally, put in the window from the backside of the bar, it is just 1/4” thick glass custom cut for the hole in my bar (11”x 19½”) by a local glass shop. It is attached by see-thru calking applied to the back of the glass and plywood to form a tight, waterproof bond all the way around the glass.

Building A Bar At Home

Building a great basement bar starts with a sturdy base. It is arguably the most important thing when building a bar, the stability of the entire bar depends on it. As you can see from picture 1a I chose to make my bar in two pieces so it could be transported if I ever choose to move. Each section is actually a little bit smaller than the main door opening in standard home so it can be moved through the door easily. NOTE: These same dimensions should work for you as well, but it would be wise to measure your door and compare it to the dimensions on the diagrams to be certain that each of the bar sides will fit through the outside door in your home. (A 30” wide doorway is required for the dimensions of this homemade bar.)

Building A Bar At Home

To commemorate our 10 year anniversary, we are making our Official HomeWetBar.com wet bar plans free! Yes, you heard that right! The famous home bar plans  that started it all are now free. It’s our way of saying thanks for the last 10 years of providing you with the most unique and fun items on the internet. Whether you chose to build a basement bar, an indoor bar, or modify these plans into a tiki bar, we hope you have as much fun building your own bar as we had making the original. Cheers!

Building A Bar At Home

Step Fifteen // How to Build a Bar Dry-Fit the Bar Molding Photo by Ryan Benyi On the bar top, use a combination square to draw 45-degree lines from the front corners. Take a piece of molding with one mitered end and hold it up to the front edge of the bar; line up the mitered end with the 45-degree mark. Snug the molding up against a mitered scrap to make sure you have a tight corner. Then, at the other end, carry the 45-degree line from the bar top over the molding’s uncut end, and miter the piece to size. Install it by screwing through the plywood underneath with 1¼-inch screws. Miter and cut the remaining sidepieces ¾ inch long to overhang the back of the bar. Finish the back edges of the bar top by cutting a 12 to fit the open notches of the molding with a saw.

Building A Bar At Home

Curves Some suppliers carry curved bar molding. But curves are costly; this radius corner was $150. Mitered corners are much cheaper! Prop it up for miters The underside of most bar molding tilts downward when installed. So you can’t just lay it on the saw bed when you make angled cuts. Instead, set the molding on blocks to hold it at the correct tilt. (You can lay the molding flat to make 90-degree cuts, however.) Tape the molding to limit tear-out where the saw teeth exit the wood. “Clamp” it with screws Bar molding is almost impossible to clamp in place. So do some test fitting, fastening it with screws from below. Make sure all the joints are aligned and snug, then remove the screws, add glue and drive the screws back in. Fill in dead ends The butt end of bar molding leaves you with exposed rabbets. Some suppliers sell end caps, which are easy to install but look awkward. So here’s a better solution: Run the bar molding about 5/8 in. past the back edge of the bar top. Then fill the rabbets with blocks cut from wood with a similar grain pattern. Hold the blocks in place for about a minute. After the glue has completely dried, sand the end flush and add the drip lip. The lip shown here is simply a homemade strip of wood, 3/8 in. thick with rounded edges. The photo shows it installed. Seal the end grain With bar molding, you get a large area of exposed end grain. The end grain of wood sucks up more stain than the face grain and turns out a lot darker—almost black if you’re using a dark stain. To prevent that, pretreat the end grain with sealer, which will partially fill the pores. A couple of ounces of polyurethane mixed with a couple of tablespoons of thinner (water or mineral spirits, depending on the type of polyurethane) works well. If you slop seal onto the face grain, sand it off.

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