Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

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Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

I honestly didn’t have an exact plan, I was just planning on letting the epoxy run over the edges and cover the pennies, with a little manipulation from me. The epoxy is really thick so I think it would have worked…though the edges, unlike the top, wouldn’t be perfectly smooth. That is also why we were trying to remove the countertop before starting the project, letting the epoxy run over the edges would have been messy and I didn’t want to do it inside my house. It all worked out in the end though, even though nothing really worked out!

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

This ultra-clear, high-gloss finishing epoxy is ideal for home improvement and craft projects. FAMOWOOD Glaze Coat is a pour-on epoxy coating that can be used on most surfaces – rough or smooth, stained or painted. It’s great for coating tables or bar tops, preserving photographs or imbedding decorative items. Just one coat equals 70 coats of varnish.

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

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Achieve an ultra-thick, ultra-glossy, waterproof finish instantly with Rust-Oleum Parks Super Glaze Pour-On Finish and Preservative. Just 1 pour of this crystal-clear epoxy is as thick as 60 coats of varnish. Perfect for bar tops, kitchen islands and more. California residents: see Proposition 65 information Pour on finish and preservative in ultra-thick high-gloss, crystal-clear epoxy that provides maximum durability and see-through Covers 6.4 sq. ft. Clear gloss finish Ideal for furniture, tabletops, bars, game boards, clocks, plaques and ceramics Resists water, heat and chemicals Pours on for ease of use Dries to touch in 8 hours Cleans up with mineral spirits Info & Guides SDS Use and Care Manual You will need Adobe® Acrobat® Reader to view PDF documents. Download a free copy from the Adobe Web site.

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

Achieve an ultra-thick, ultra-glossy, waterproof finish instantly with Rust-Oleum Parks Super Glaze Pour-On Finish and Preservative. Just 1 pour of this crystal-clear epoxy is as thick as 60 coats of varnish. Perfect for bar tops, kitchen islands and more. California residents: see Proposition 65 information Pour on finish and preservative in ultra-thick high-gloss, crystal-clear epoxy that provides maximum durability and see-through Covers 6.4 sq. ft. Clear gloss finish Ideal for furniture, tabletops, bars, game boards, clocks, plaques and ceramics Resists water, heat and chemicals Pours on for ease of use Dries to touch in 8 hours Cleans up with mineral spirits

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

I was wondering what type of epoxy you used. I have done a tabletop for a boat with pictures of visitors embedded in epoxy–like you said, blew out the bubbles with a hair dryer, and it worked great. I was able to set hot items on the table, direct from the oven. Can you do that with this? Do you think it’s practical to use all over the kitchen, or only where it’s more decorative than functional?

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

The epoxy (which I bought HERE) was actually fairly easy. We just mixed according to instructions, poured, and spread with a putty knife. The epoxy was self leveling, so we didn’t have to be too exact. We did get a ton of bubbles, so we went over it with the blow dryer to bring them to the surface. Whichever ones we didn’t get with the blow dryer I popped with a toothpick. We let it sit overnight and in the morning it looked glossy and perfect!

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

 Since the epoxy was so easy we decided it was worth another coat. Baaaaaad idea, the second coat was a disaster. It didn’t self level, so it was super wavy and looked terrible.  Lesson learned…when doing epoxy, make sure you do a THICK coat – thin ones don’t turn out well.

Bar Top Epoxy Home Depot

I was just planning on letting the epoxy run over the edges and then smoothing it all out. I have no idea how you would seal it an a totally vertical surface. Maybe cut out some thin plywood in the exact shape of the backsplash, cover with pennies and epoxy, and then install with some liquid nails? that’s the best I’ve got.

Do you mean 100% poly as in polyurethane? Would your just pour it over your pennies like we did epoxy? I’m not asking because I have an answer, it just never crossed my mind to use poly. It just might work, though I’m not sure it would make for a better finish than the epoxy…it would be cheaper though.

Overview Overview Model # Y236000 Store SKU # 1000686141 Bar & Table Finish is a pour-on finish and preservative. Ultra-thick, high gloss and crystal clear epoxy that provides maximum durability. Water-proof and resists heat and chemicals. Ideal for table and bar tops, crafts and furniture refinishing.

Overview Model # Y236000 Store SKU # 1000686141 Bar & Table Finish is a pour-on finish and preservative. Ultra-thick, high gloss and crystal clear epoxy that provides maximum durability. Water-proof and resists heat and chemicals. Ideal for table and bar tops, crafts and furniture refinishing.

This is awesome, I’ve seen penny toilet seat covers but never a penny breakfast bar. Now you’re giving me lots of ideas and I want to now go home, rip out my countertops and line them with fancy colorful post cards and epoxy.

Achieve an ultra-thick, ultra-glossy, waterproof finish instantly with Rust-Oleum Parks Super Glaze Pour-On Finish and Preservative. Just 1 pour of this crystal-clear epoxy is as thick as 60 coats of varnish. Perfect for bar tops, kitchen islands and more.

turned out to be really cool, but really expensive.  Then Em hit on this idea she saw in a blog.  I believe this was the original entry she read about it in.  The basic idea is you take a two part epoxy, the kind used to seal traditional bar tops or those

wow…it looks incredible. what drama with that epoxy, huh? incredible story to boot! i’ll be featuring you this monday, and of course, sharing at pinterest. 🙂 thanks for posting this to creative juice. this is one to remember for the next house. i’m sure the hubby would love that idea for his future bar in the man cave.

Last September we finished our butcher block countertops, but we didn’t do our bar area. I mentioned in that post that I was open to suggestions and got the great idea to cover it in pennies and epoxy.  Well,  EIGHT months later it is finally finished!

Achieve an ultra-thick, ultra-glossy, waterproof finish instantly with Rust-Oleum Parks Super Glaze Pour-On Finish and Preservative. Just one pour of this crystal-clear epoxy is as thick as 60 coats of varnish. Perfect for bar tops, kitchen islands and more.

I love your blog, I am planning on covering my Kitchen floor in pennies with alot of help from my son. I hope the epoxy works, I can’t find any other product that would give the thickness I need to cover the pennies. I love your bar

Well, in my head we were going guide the epoxy over the edges with the putty knife and let it cover the sides, letting it drip onto a plastic sheet and then cleaning up the bottom drips. It’s pretty thick stuff, so I wasn’t worried about it running off the top. I figured the edges wouldn’t be smooth (kinda ripply), but I was okay with it…mostly cause it’s was the best plan I could come up with.

This looks awesome! I will definitely be trying this with a counter top in the future. For now, it wouldn’t go with the kitchen decor, but I like the idea that someone posted about just painting and then covering with epoxy. When you painted yours black for the first layer, did you sand the laminate or prime it? I was wondering how it held up when it dried.

This concrete table top replaces an easily-scratched top of an otherwise lovely and useful dining room table. Designer Andrea Crawford of Couture House Interiors decided to create this concrete table top because she needed a table top that was durable… and the fact that it’s a bit chic makes it all the better. Follow along as she shows us, step-by-step how she created the concrete table top– covered the existing table top in concrete, to be precise. You’ll see it’s surprisingly easy to do, and the results are impressive.

Second, and far more important, how much of that epoxy did you use for that counter, and what were its dimensions, please? I guess I can do my own volume calculations, but it would help to have at least a rough estimate as a jumping-off point. Now……off to explore this site. THANKS!

I really hope this page is still checked from time to time. If not;….well……I’ll just be glad to share my admiration for this project into the cold, vast emptiness of the Internet. That penny counter is amazing, and I’m so glad you shared some of the pitfalls so that, should I try a similar project, I could avoid them and create some of my own. Two tings, though. First, in Canada, we no longer have pennies. Unless you can find a hoarder, there is no way to get any. I’m guessing I’d end up using vase gems or similar. Second, and far more important, how much of that epoxy did you use for that counter, and what were its dimensions, please? I guess I can do my own volume calculations, but it would help to have at least a rough estimate as a jumping-off point. Now……off to explore this site. THANKS! Jim PS…I’ve seen those paper bag floors mentioned in the comment above mine, and they’re fantastic1

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